Friday, April 9, 2021

Ribbon Cutting and Grand Opening!

Join us next Monday, April 12 at 1:00 p.m. CDT for a virtual livestream ribbon cutting and grand opening ceremony for the new Tennessee State Library and Archives on http://bit.ly/TNSOSFacebook or http://bit.ly/TNSOSYouTube


The Library and Archives will also host an open house on Tuesday, April 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. CDT in their new building on Bicentennial Mall at the intersection of Rep. John Lewis Way N. and Jefferson St. in Nashville. Library and Archives staff will be available to explain the building’s new features and work done in each area as visitors take self-guided tours.

Although guests do not need a reservation for tours the building, we do ask that researchers email ask@tsla.libanswers.com to schedule your visit. Guests are required to wear a mask. Click HERE to learn more.


The Tennessee State Library and Archives is a division of the Office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Thursday, April 8, 2021

State Library and Archives Moving More Than A Half Million Pieces of Tennessee’s History to New Home


In the past two months, the Tennessee State Library and Archives team has moved more than half a million pieces of Tennessee's history to their new home on Bicentennial Mall.

Learn more about the move and their collections here bit.ly/TSLAMove.


The Tennessee State Library and Archives is a division of the Office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Tuesday, March 2, 2021

Tennessee’s State Constitutions Transferred to New Home

On Monday, March 1, 2021, the Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA) with the assistance of the Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP), with support from the THP Honor Guard, transported Tennessee’s three constitutions from our current building to our new, soon to open home on Bicentennial Mall.



Preserving Tennessee’s legal and civic history is among the Library & Archives’ statutory responsibilities. Tennessee’s three Constitutions, first written in 1796 and revised in 1834 and 1870, are the highest valued and most historically significant items in TSLA’s collection.

 
 

Learn more about our state's constitutions on our website, tn.sos.gov.

For the latest information about the new building opening in the days ahead, follow the TSLA's social media channels:

Facebook: @TNStateLibraryArchives and Instagram: @tnlibarchives along with the Secretary of State’s Twitter account: @SecTreHargett.


The Tennessee State Library and Archives is a division of the Office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Thursday, February 25, 2021

New Tennessee State Library and Archives Building Set to Open in April


We are excited to announce that the Tennessee State Library and Archives will open to the public in our new location on Bicentennial Mall on April 13, 2021.

We will share more information about the new building and some of its state-of-the-art features in the coming weeks. In the meantime,  CLICK HERE to read our press release for more information.

For the latest information about the new building opening in the days ahead, follow the TSLA's social media channels:

Facebook: @TNStateLibraryArchives and Instagram: @tnlibarchives along with the Secretary of State’s Twitter account: @SecTreHargett.


The Tennessee State Library and Archives is a division of the Office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Monday, December 28, 2020

Temporary Public Closure Notice...




The Library & Archives is temporarily closed to the public until further notice. In addition, starting January 8th some services and collections will not be available due to our move to the new building.

Patrons are encouraged to continue to use TSLA's services remotely. To request remote assistance, call 615-741-2764 or email ask@tsla.libanswers.com 

You may also chat with a librarian for reference assistance.

We look forward to serving you!


The Tennessee State Library and Archives is a division of the Office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Tennessee’s State Capitol the Subject of New Book Published by the Tennessee Department of State

The Tennessee State Library & Archives and the Office of Secretary of State Tre Hargett are excited to announce the release of a new book chronicling, the Tennessee State Capitol. This new book, Tennessee State Capitol: A Tennessee Treasure, celebrates the monumental building on Capitol Hill that has served as the Volunteer State’s seat of government since before the Civil War. The book was written and researched by former Assistant State Archivist Dr. Wayne Moore, and published by the Tennessee Secretary of State.



It is lavishly illustrated with rare photographs, maps, and other images from the Library & Archives’ collections, some of which were only recently conserved. Tennessee State Capitol presents the statehouse’s history in five authoritative yet accessible chapters. Topics include architect William Strickland and early construction, completion of the building, the capitol’s property and grounds, and subsequent renovations and restorations. At the Library & Archives, we’re especially proud of the pages dedicated to the library’s original home in the capitol, now known as the Legislative Lounge (see the image from Chapter 3). A helpful glossary is at the end of the book for readers new to architectural terminology.

Table of Contents

Sample page, Chapter 2

Sample page, Chapter 3

Sample page, Chapter 4


Copies of Tennessee State Capitol: A Tennessee Treasure are available at https://sos.tn.gov/tncapitolbook. The price is $29.50 plus tax and shipping. A limited number of copies are available on-site at the Library & Archives; please call 615-741-2764 for more information.


The Tennessee State Library and Archives is a division of the Office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Monday, August 24, 2020

The Ardent Gardeners Association

By Allison Griffey

The Ardent Gardeners Association was organized in 1951 by twenty-three women in Nashville following the tradition of garden clubs formed in the late forties after World War II. Two teachers, Blanche Ennix and Ruth McAlpin, spearheaded the effort. Inspired by their enthusiasm and commitment to the new organization, Dr. William H. Grant, the husband of charter member, Ruth Grant, suggested the name the Ardent Gardeners.


The Ardent Gardeners’ first flower show on July 11, 1952, at the Hadley Park Community Center (left to right): Henri Dixon, Rhea Tarleton, Ruth McAlpin, Ruth Grant, Dora McClelland, Hazel Burley, Rachel Lindsay, Arthurine Welch, Lillian Thomas, Mary Walker, Carrie Denney, Martha Allen, Mattie Claiborne, Kathleen Lawrence, Mattie Flowers, Alberta Bontemps, Elizabeth Petway Lowe, Eva Nash, Blanche Ennix, and Thelma Treherne.
Ardent Gardeners Association Records, 1951-1998, Box 3, Folder 7.
https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/ardent-gardeners-association-records-1951-1998




Library decorations at the Ardent Gardeners Association’s “A Holiday House” event at the home of Elise Frazier, undated.
Ardent Gardeners Association Records, 1951-1998, Box 3, Folder 2.
https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/ardent-gardeners-association-records-1951-1998



Club members dedicated themselves to learning about growing and arranging plants throughout the year, especially flowers. They organized workshops and clinics to learn about flower arranging and gardening from industry professionals. On July 11, 1952, the Ardent Gardeners hosted their first flower show at the Hadley Park Community Center. Following the success of their flower shows, the club presented a winter event called “A Holiday House” on December 11, 1955, at the home of Ruth Grant. The group continued to hold this holiday event on and off until 1974 when they discontinued the tradition because local florists started holding similar events.



Ardent Gardeners picnic in Ruth Grant’s backyard, undated.
Ardent Gardeners Association Records, 1951-1998, Box 3, Folder 2.
https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/ardent-gardeners-association-records-1951-1998





Zenobia Beck at her home garden, undated.
Ardent Gardeners Association Records, 1951-1998, Box 3, Folder 4.
https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/ardent-gardeners-association-records-1951-1998



Outside of club meetings and shows, the Ardent Gardeners also served their community. Members helped the Metro Beautification Commission clear out the former Maxwell House lot on Fourth and Church Streets to create “The World’s First Instant Park” in 1964. They also decorated the Hubbard Hospital Medical College in partnership with other garden clubs. In 1984, they dedicated the atrium garden fountain at Meharry Medical College to their first president, Ruth McAlpin. They named the Meharry atrium garden “The Doris Campbell Busby Memorial Garden” in 1986 after one of their most devoted leaders. In 1991, the Ardent Gardeners celebrated their fortieth anniversary with a luncheon at the Pineapple Room of Cheekwood Gardens.



Alberta Bontemps demonstrates special arrangements required by some containers, undated.
Ardent Gardeners Association Records, 1951-1998, Box 3, Folder 5.
https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/ardent-gardeners-association-records-1951-1998





The Ardent Gardeners’ fortieth-anniversary luncheon at Cheekwood on April 7, 1991 (front row left to right): Lillian Thomas, Mattie Johnson, Delores Crump, Ruth Grant, Isabel Watkins, Gretchen Payne, Carrie Denney, Alberta Bontemps, Elise Frazier, Blanche Ennix, Willie Mae Martin, Mattie Flowers (back row left to right): Zenobia Beck, Eugenia McGinnis, Rachel Lindsay, Kathleen Lawrence, Tyree Miller, Corinne Schuster, Alice Archer, Hazel Burley, Dora McClellan, Helena Perry, Jayme Williams, Patsy Petway.
Ardent Gardeners Association Records, 1951-1998, Box 3, Folder 7.
https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/ardent-gardeners-association-records-1951-1998





The Library and Archives holds the Ardent Gardeners’ records from 1951 to 1998. The association remains active in the Nashville community to this day. This blog post is a summary of a document found in the collection called “History of the Ardent Gardeners Club of Nashville, Tennessee” written by charter member, Dolores Crump. 

Readers and researchers who want to learn more are encouraged to contact the Library and Archives to schedule an appointment to view the collection. 


The Tennessee State Library and Archives is a division of the Office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett